• Locally brewed cask ale at the pub: 300 grams carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).

• Extensively transported bottled beer purchased from a shop: 900g CO2e.

For comparison, the average can of Coca-Cola soda has a carbon footprint of 170g CO2e.

Drinking locally brewed beer not only supports your local breweries, but also helps reduce the pollution caused by the transportation of beers brewed far from where you live—domestic or international.

Most food items, including beer, travel over 1,000 miles (1,609 km) before they reach our frosty mugs. Diesel exhaust from trucks transporting these goods across the country contains at least forty chemicals believed to be toxic to humans and the environment. And carbon monoxide from vehicles accounts for 56 percent of total emissions nationwide. Buying local (and organic if possible) means reducing emissions and overall carbon footprint. Keep in mind that just because something is brewed locally doesn’t mean all of its ingredients are local.



Another sizeable eco-impact of beer brewing is the manufacturing and disposal of bottles, cans, and containers. Transporting (heavy) glass produces more emissions than (lighter) aluminum cans. One way to minimize emissions when drinking an imported beer is to choose cans. This is a tricky decision; can linings often contain BPA, a controversial chemical that has been linked to multiple health issues and is banned from use in children’s products in some states. To avoid cans and bottles altogether, reduce solid waste and the energy involved with all of those empties, drink the beer on tap at your local spot.


Here is some interesting analysis from Beverage Industry Environmental Roundtable, June 2012

The overall carbon footprint for a European bottle format is estimated at 140 grams of CO2 per 33 centiliter bottle

• Malt (39%),
• Brewery GHG emissions (25%),
• Glass bottle (13%), and
• Distribution transportation (13%).

For the 355 milliliter North American can, the overall carbon footprint was estimated at 321 grams of CO2 per can.

• Aluminum can (41%),
• Malt (33%),
• Brewery GHG emissions (12%), and
• Distribution transportation (8%).

Another sizeable eco-impact of beer brewing is the manufacturing and disposal of bottles, cans, and containers. Transporting (heavy) glass produces more emissions than (lighter) aluminum cans. One way to minimize emissions when drinking an imported beer is to choose cans. This is a tricky decision; can linings often contain BPA, a controversial chemical that has been linked to multiple health issues and is banned from use in children’s products in some states. To avoid cans and bottles altogether, reduce solid waste and the energy involved with all of those empties, drink the beer on tap at your local spot.

Did you know that CO2e and other Green House Gases lead to global warming and climate change?
The simplest way to combat climate change caused by CO2 and other green house gas emissions is to plant trees: Trees breathe in Carbon Di Oxide and through the process of photo-synthesis create food for themselves and breathe out Oxygen. 


 
Sustainable Green Initiative plants fruit trees to help fight
  • carbon emissions and climate change, 
  • hunger, poverty 
  • and rural migration.
A mature tree sequesters about 1 ton of carbon and processes enough oxygen for two peoples requirements in its life-time? That's enough to sequester CO2e caused by 3000 pint bottles of beer.

Do take care of your carbon footprint.  Plant a tree today.


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